It Is OK to Doodle

Lily M

 

Let me start with a little secret … I cannot draw.

I tell my students this and try to show them that they don’t have to be great artists to create art that helps them think critically about texts. This is even more important now that I work at a high school where one of the four pillars of our plan is an arts-infused curriculum. One of the educators who helped to write the plan, and who is now our principal, explained to me that arts-infused means thinking through art. We’re not trying to be a Fame school, but rather we’re trying to use the arts as a way of thinking across disciplines.

The idea of an arts-infused curriculum was a huge draw for me as a teacher. I have always incorporated art into my teaching of English. I have asked kids to storyboard and create other types of artistic interpretations of text, often using symbols to represent their thinking. I know that some teachers subtly put down this type of work. They argue that it just isn’t rigorous. Despite the deep thinking I see when students use drawing or art, I had trouble articulating how it helped my students think through text.

Luckily, a couple of things have happened recently that have helped me understand why incorporating art is worth it. … KEEP READING

Close Reading: Let’s Make an Ordeal

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For many of us, the word “ordeal” connotes negativity, and we’re all trying to keep that out of our classrooms. I have used of one of my favorite college reads, Wuther Crue’s 1932 Vanity Fair phenomenon “Ordeal by Cheque,” to put a positive spin on the word and teach the art of close reading. I remember having to review each check and come up with “the story” when I was in college and  I love it. Here are a few reasons why it works just as well today. … KEEP READING

Top Ten Reminders for Timed Writings

Top 10 (2)

Here are 10 reminders to give your students for timed-writing assignments:

1. Write in literary present tense. The text is alive and speaking to readers today, not just when it was written.

2. Create a thesis that not only addresses the prompt but offers an opinion that the essay can defend.

3. Maintain focus by checking that every sentence directly relates to the thesis. If a thought or sentence does not tie to the thesis, mark it out and continue. KEEP READING

Developing Self-Assessment with the Dual-Entry Rubric and Author’s Memo

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If you don’t score essays with rubrics, you probably have good reason. Maybe you don’t accept that all the qualities of an essay can be reduced to metrics, or resist the pressure to standardize students’ performances, or feel that rubrics are an overly legalistic means to cover yourself when students or parents protest a grade, or balk at the notion that evaluating essays is objective.

If you do score essays with rubrics, you probably have good reason. Maybe you want to make essay evaluation more transparent to students, or feel that itemizing an essay’s strengths and weaknesses benefits writers, or believe in making essay scoring as objective as possible. … KEEP READING

The Freedom to Respond: Q3 on the AP Exam

Suggested

 

The one question on the AP exam that produces the most anxiety is the free response question, Q3. I have had students tell me they become overwhelmed with the choices listed and cannot decide which book best fits the question. Or, they go in with a novel in mind that they know well, and the question doesn’t match their selected novel, and they scramble to make a suitable choice.

I wanted to find out which books provided the most versatility for the AP exam and which books students were expected to have read or have knowledge of in college courses. … KEEP READING

Shakespeare Comes Alive

the-apps-the-thing-shakespeare-rebooted-rotator

 

Think back to your experiences learning Shakespeare when you were in high school. Rather than simply reading the play, the teacher probably told you that you would be performing it in class. While this sounds like it might be fun, it probably devolved into a few apathetic students standing at the front of the room reading in monotone voices.

Students learn Shakespeare when they perform Shakespeare. They understand his words when they can truly interact with them. Unfortunately, most of our students aren’t actors, and they really aren’t comfortable performing in front of their classmates. How can we get our students to engage with Hamlet & Macbeth in ways that won’t bore or embarrass them? … KEEP READING

Multiple Choice Monday

socrative

 

Each Monday my students do multiple choice practice. My non-AP classes work on SAT reading comprehension questions while my AP students focus on AP exam type questions. Tests vary in length each week from 10 questions to a full AP practice exam of 55 questions. Multiple-choice practice can often suck the life out of a class, yet practice is necessary in order to increase reading comprehension skills and prepare for the exam.

I have started using Socrative in all of my classes for several reasons. Students benefit from Socrative because it provides a game-based feel for an ordinarily mundane activity and gives immediate feedback on questions. Teachers benefit from Socrative because valuable class time is not wasted on questions the entire class answered correctly, and data can be saved from each practice test in order to tailor future lessons to class weaknesses. … KEEP READING

Episode 1 of The Test

THE PERKS OFOWNING A CAT

pl-itunes

 

 

Could they read and could they write? That’s what they wanted to know. Of course they could do it, but how well could they do it? So they worked in silence for three hours, reading and writing. That’s all it took — three hours. A year’s worth of work, and it was done in three hours. And then, they awaited judgement.

Issac and Annie are two of the nearly 400,000 students globally that took the AP Literature and Composition exam last year. It is a rigorous exam. Typically, the best and brightest students in a school take AP exams, at least that’s the way it was when I was in school.  The multiple choice section lasts an hour. Then in the next two hours students write three essays, back to back to back. Its exhausting. Few do well on it.

How tough is it? Well only 8% scored a 5 last year. 18% scored a 4. If you do the math, and bear with me I’m an English teacher, nearly 75% failed to score a four or a five. 75% of the smart kids. That’s a tough exam. But when you want to award college credit for high school students, this isn’t the in-house soccer program, not everyone gets a trophy.

But Is it fair? Can a test, especially a high-stakes one, reveal what you know?

This is a podcast about one TEST. I want to know what those two students did to succeed? What did their teachers teach? Did they teach to the test? Did they ignore it? But once you start asking those questions, your magnifying glass picks up clues that lead down a much bigger rabbit hole. It leads you to wonder, what should a test do? Are we testing too much? How do you help a struggling reader?  Can you assess a student, a school, and entire educational initiative if you don’t test what they know and how they’ve progressed? And what about the students? What impact is all this having on them? Over the next few weeks, I’m going to talk to students, teachers, test makers, advocates and critics. I’m going to ask questions of them all to better understand where we are, what’s working and what isn’t, and the impact its having.

Welcome to THE TEST

Gimme More Rules So I Can Be Free!

rules

 

“The more constraints one imposes, the more one frees oneself of the chains that shackle the spirit… the arbitrariness of the constraint only serves to obtain precision of execution.” — Igor Stravinsky

Students often want to know why an author did not say something in a more straightforward way. Why didn’t Shakespeare just say the girl was hot? Why did he have to get all “shall I compare thee to a summer’s day” about it? Yet when we turn the question around and ask our students to write descriptively about, well, anything, they often hit the blank white paper wall. … KEEP READING

Advertising Fallacies: Snowboarding Cars and Other Fine Things

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If there ever is a perfect time to teach visual analysis, appeals, and SOAPSTone, now is the time. You can’t look anywhere without being bombarded by pressure—to be the best, to have the best. The message everywhere is BUY.

In today’s media-driven society, teens are immersed in advertising. In most cases, because it is so ubiquitous, they don’t even notice. They tune out the bar on the Facebook Wall, the popups in their favorite phone games, and can even fast-forward through commercials with their DVR. This, however, doesn’t mean that they are immune to the subtle effects. Now, more than ever, we need to teach them to read these things for what they are—ploys to make money. … KEEP READING

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