Escape from the Ordinary Unit

Teaching on Physical, Psychological, or SocialConstraints-

Are you getting bored teaching the same works but don’t have the resources to trade out novels? Or perhaps you are just looking to create a different unit from scratch? Look no further. The following list is compiled from a Twitter chat hosted by Talks with Teachers to brainstorm resources for teaching texts dealing with the theme of escape – perfect for a Halloween twist. These resources include major works, short stories, poems, songs, Ted Talks, films, documentaries, writing ideas, question ideas, and more. Pick and choose what you need to create your own unit. … KEEP READING

Teaching on the Theme of Power

Power-Resources to Customize a Unit

Are you considering teaching a unit on power? Or perhaps you are looking for some resources to pair with a major text with a theme of power? Look no further. The following list is compiled from a Twitter chat hosted by Talks with Teachers to brainstorm resources for teaching texts dealing with the theme of power. These resources include major works, visual art pieces (click on the link to see the picture), songs, Ted Talks, films, documentaries, writing ideas, question ideas, and more. Pick and choose what you need to create your own unit.  … KEEP READING

The Things They Carried: Lesson Ideas

things_they_carried

The Things They Carry by Tim O’Brien has become a favorite in my AP Literature classroom. O’Brien’s journalistic style allows students to delve into theme and literary analysis without being weighed down with heavy diction and ornate syntax, but this is by no means a lightweight book. The stories and reality of war bring the depth.

Lesson Ideas:

Anticipation Activity:

I ask students to write down twelve things that they anticipate they will take to college. These should include a mix of tangible items such as their phone, blanket, and favorite coffee mug with intangible items such as their mother’s love and memories from high school. Students cut these items into strips and turn them face down on their desk. I randomly choose six items from each student’s desk. Students then write for five to ten minutes on their feelings of what was taken, how life will be without those things, what was left, and general observations. Students are then prepped for a conversation on the randomness of war, the effects of war, and personal sacrifices the war required of soldiers the same age as many of my students. Some students are surprised to learn that losing some things can be good but most have negative effects; some students.KEEP READING

Choice Reading and AP Lit: It Can Be Done

how-to-implement-choice-readingin-your-classroom

I am a big fan of choice reading in my classroom.  With my 9th graders, our classroom culture largely focuses around our choice novels, and my students display their love of reading.   And then I get them as seniors, and we hit AP Lit.  Many teachers (and students) feel that choice reading and AP Lit cannot work together.  But, I’ve been able to prove that they can.  Here are the top 8 ways to make choice reading successful in an AP class:KEEP READING