Using Student Data for Self-Evaluation

The questionnaire

One of my favorite aspects of teaching AP Literature is helping students become independent learners and learn how to make adjustments in studying based on personal progress. Since AP Literature has so many moving parts, the nature of the class calls for individualized reflection and goal setting. One student may naturally be gifted in writing analysis essays while another is a cautious close reader. Some students find their sweet spot to be modern poetry while others are more comfortable in Romantic prose. Helping students note areas of strengths and weaknesses enables them to identify patterns and make adjustments but also teaches them valuable study skills for college. KEEP READING

Poetry Props: Strategies for Student Understanding

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TP-CASTT, SOAPStone, and DIDLS have been long-time methods of teaching students how to unpack and understand poetry. These have their place in the classroom and offer students a structured approach to poetry. In the past few years, however, class discussions and the teaching of poetry has become more organic and student-driven. With that in mind, here are some simple activities to use in the classroom when teaching poetry: … KEEP READING

The Pride of a Hard-fought Two

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Students are not the only ones who get nervous when their AP scores are published in July. Teachers also feel the same nerves when they login into their College Board accounts to review their students’ scores. Theses scores represent the hard work of both students and teachers during the school year.

I am no different. I still feel the butterflies dancing around in my stomach as I scroll through the scores my students earned on the AP Literature exam. For the most part, students earn about what I thought they would earn. Sure, there are surprises on the upside and a few on the downside, but most scores are what I anticipated they would be based on their work throughout the year. … KEEP READING

Student Feedback : The Writing Conference

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This past week my PLN has been discussing feedback on Voxer forcing me to rethink feedback in general, its effectiveness, and what it looks like in the classroom. My beliefs and practices concerning feedback have drastically changed in the last few years and will most likely continue to change as I grow. While there are multiple avenues for feedback, this post will focus on the writing conference, the tool that has changed my feedback most drastically in the past couple of years. 

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Using Children’s Books as Mentor Texts

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One of the best professional decisions I have made was applying to become a fellow with the National Writing Project. Because of my interaction with colleagues across the spectrum from K-12, my teaching has expanded and I see possibility everywhere. One of my favorite techniques for assessing students both for formative and summative purposes that has come out of these connections has been through the use of children’s books. Here are three of my favorites:KEEP READING

AP Lit Quickfire Challenge

Quickfire Challenge

 Have you ever had one of those loose-ends days where the students are tired, you’re worn down, and everyone is a bit unmotivated or even unwilling to give the content or curriculum the TLC it deserves? I offer you a quick fix, or “fixe” if you will…the AP Lit Quickfire Challenge!

Inspired by the “Quickfire Challenge” on reality show Top Chef, students have one class period, and one class period only, to create an intentionally designed product highlighting the literary element dujour. Similarly to the show, students may only use whatever’s in the kitchen. And by kitchen, I mean classroom. … KEEP READING